Do you pump or bail?

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Do you pump or bail?

PaulW
Administrator
A capsize can focus the mind.
Do you have a bilge pump in your Morbic, or other dinghy?
Where is it mounted?
Where is the suction point?
Is it electric or manual?
Do you recommend anything in particular? (Or to avoid?)
Any other thoughts?
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Re: Do you pump or bail?

John S
Oh dear, sounds like there's a story behind that question

I simply take a scoop bailer with me, but I haven't tried it in earnest. I picked up an Elvstrom self-bailer at the Worthing boat jumble for peanuts, and I must get round to fitting it. I reckon the Morbic will have enough speed to make it work if necessary, and it will drain the boat on land much better than the bung at the back.
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Re: Do you pump or bail?

PaulW
Administrator
Ah yes John.  You guessed!  But not very exciting.  The mast went slightly past horizontal.  Only about 1ft of legs got wet, and that probably just from standing in the righted, swamped boat.  I'll spare you details unless you would like to analyse them (or me).

Isn't there someone in our fraternity who has tried an e-pump?

Self bailer?  Does a swamped Morbic go fast enough to self bail?  And don't they always weep inward?  There is some discussion about whether TWO are needed > Here <.

Draining on land? - Take a rest on the slipway to let the bunghole do its job!
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Re: Do you pump or bail?

Jon Dykes
They always say that the best bilge pump in the world is a frightened man with a bucket!
I use a plastic hand pump which is way quicker than a scoop, though I do have a scoop too for answering the call of nature 😜
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Re: Do you pump or bail?

AndyN
Cadfael was fitted with a high capacity self-bailer. On a good reach in a fresh breeze it would draw. However, it does weep. In fact sometimes it's hard to re-seal it and you have to jigger about with it to get it to stop flowing inwards. A misplaced foot can start it flowing again. It's coming out over the winter. I have a silicon rubber bucket which collapses into a flat disc which is really good and a scoop for smaller quantities and to get in between frames. I would not go to an e-pump personally as the beauty of these boats for me is their simplicity. Also I doubt if you could install enough battery power to cope with a semi-swamped boat.
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Re: Do you pump or bail?

Michael and Sarah Curtis
There are two of us so we pump and bail! We have had a practice capsize on the lake at Dorchester SC with a light wind, wearing dry suits and observed /advised from a safety boat. Not conditions in which one would capsize but the aim was to establish the roles we would take if needed. Lessons learnt: Sarah is too light to right the boat. Michael is heavy enough but only with the aid of the righting lines as there is no grip to be had on the hull and the gunwhale is out of reach. One tosses the line over while facing away from the boat. A rope ladder reachable over the stern from the water helps re-entry. Buoyancy aids ride up without crutch straps: now fitted. Lots of water aboard, but below centreboard slot. Boat stable and bailed using bucket and plastic hand pump. Seemed about equally efficient. Our bailer is too small and our fitted small diameter hand pump is inadequate. We have extra forward buoyancy tanks which probably reduce water intake but also place the centreboard higher out of the water. Mike and Sarah.